Signal Station 1804

Photography did not arrive until 1827 so the important images of earlier times were captured by artist like Captain Sir William Smith who was in the Royal Engineers he made sketches of his building work at different locations in Ireland. Graphite and Ink Washes was the method that he used to produce the drawings showed below of Malin Head during the early years.

 
Picture Caption reads: View of the Naval Signal Station at Malin Head designed, built and drawn by Sir William Smith in 1804.

Captain Sir William Smith who was also an artist includes sketches of the Malin Head signal station in his collection.

An early drawing of 1804 of the Malin Head site by Sir William Smith shows the signal mast and a small hut as shown above. The Malin Head Napoleonic Signal Tower was built a year later in 1805 after these drawings were made.
 
The signal crews were drawn from what were known as the Sea Fencibles, a form of naval reserve made up of local fishermen and merchant seamen commanded by naval officers, including signal lieutenants. The composition of signal-station crews included a signal lieutenant, a midshipman and two signalmen of the Sea Fencibles.

Military guards of some five to seven yeomanry or infantry were also located at signal stations, amounting to around ten men at each station.


Picture Caption reads: View of the Naval Signal Station at Malin head seen looking the way of Malin Well erected by Sir William Smith in 1804 & also drawn by him.
 
The Malin Head Napoleonic Signal Tower was built a year later in 1805 after these drawings were made.


 

 

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